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20100901
20100930
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KPIX (CBS) 8
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
CBS
Sep 20, 2010 7:00am PDT
test. will a judge send her to jail. >> troublinging news about sex ed. jennifer ashton will explain why one third of teens know little about birth control. explain why one-third of teens no very little about birth control. this is "the early show" on cbs. ♪ get up, get moving. subway has breakfast. and it's a slam dunk. i like my breakfast sandwich with green peppers, onion, banana peppers and mustard. i like eggs with black forest ham on wheat. with everything. i like a little kick. that's a good call. i like mine with egg whites. and... a napkin. [ male announcer ] have you built your better breakfast? now's the time! try our better-for-you western egg white muffin melt or the dee-licious double bacon egg and cheese on toasty flatbread. subway. build your better breakfast. [ female announcer ] we've got stains, down to a science. new wisk, with our breakthrough stain spectrum technology targets all the major stain groups like particulates and oils. its enzymes and cleaning agents fight a full range of stains. ♪ you'll never look at stains, the same way again. for a more powerf
CBS
Sep 28, 2010 7:00am PDT
cans to improve your stress and balance like our dr. jennifer ashton is demonstrating. we're going to talk to her ahead about what else you can do. >> also ahead this morning, it took years for society to slowly isolate or ban smokers from restaurants, right, and from airplanes. now it's sort of, you would never expect to see a smoker in there, right? some people are equating families with small children, misbehaving children, not our children, maggie. >> of course not. >> as the new smokers. the new sort of persona non grata would be the screaming child in a restaurant. a lot of people might agree with it. but should they be banned from public places or even from airplanes as some people have suggested. >> or have a separate section. >> that has been another theory. we're going to talk about that this morning with our dr. jennifer hartstein who is here with some tips for all of us to live a little more peacefully together. >> i see dave nod being emphatically. if they were banning your dog wally who you take everywhere would you be as excited about this? >> first of all, wally doe
CBS
Sep 13, 2010 7:00am PDT
the intruders took jennifer to a bank and forced her to withdraw thousands from her account. a bank teller called police but by the time they arrived, the two children and mother were dead. house burned to the ground. they tried to escape but crashed into a barricade. william petit, who barely made it alive, suffered severe injuries. at a memorial service days later, he spoke about the tragedy. >> i guess if there's anything to be gained from the senseless deaths of my beautiful family, it's for us to all go forward. >> reporter: over the last three years he has launched a craw sad to have both men convicted and executed for their crimes. fighting proposed bills to ban the death penalty in connecticut. dr. petit, the survivor, made his plea very public and the governor reportedly decided not to sign the bill because of this case. >> reporter: this this morning, charged with capital murder, kidnapping, sexual assault, burglary and arson, 47-year-old steven hayes will finally face justice. both accused killers will be tried separately and dr. petit is expected to testify against both of them
CBS
Sep 24, 2010 7:00am PDT
dr. jennifer hartstein she's a child and adolescent psychologist. >> good morning. >> 400% increase in the last 10 years. why do you think it's been so dramatic? >> it's an incredibly huge increase. i think there's ease of use. >> easy access like the girl said. >> it's in your house, your medicine cabinet. you don't have to seek it out. you can hide it more. the signs aren't there, so the parents can know what you're doing. >> what's also scary, kids are younger and younger. kids as young as 12 years old doing that. >> 12 and older. >> if your kid smokes you can smell the smoke. if your kid drinks you can see they are drunk. if they abuse prescription drugs, how can you tell? >> it's harder. talking about feeling hot, maybe they are nauseous eyes are red, nose running, lethargic, trouble in school. some of the signs are the same. it's much harder to look for. you have to look in your cabinets and see what's going on. >> not just cabinets. aren't there other hot spots. >> medicine cabinet. kitchen, households appliances. garages, they are using inhalan
CBS
Sep 21, 2010 7:00am PDT
of hollywoodlife.com and our medical corner dr. jennifer act shonn. bonnie, you, of course, covered the premiere. what were the reviews that you got from your reporter about michael douglas? >> he looked fantastic. i saw the pictures myself. he looked robust. he was strong. he didn't look in any way sick. the only thing is, he didn't talk much. he was protecting his voice. >> because, as we know, you know, they can lose their voice from all of the treatment, doctor, right? >> absolutely. it can affect your voice. it can cause hoarseness but the important thing is impact on his nutritional status because with any treatment radiation to the throat it not only kills cancer but it kills or damages the healthy tissue around there also. being able to swallow, being able to eat, being able to drink will all be impaired, and his nutrition will suffer, as anyone knows fighting a chronic illness you need good nutrition. that's going to be his major struggle. >> amazing that he turned out for this, considering what he's going through. >> he looked determined. he had said he wanted to walk the carpet. he's
CBS
Sep 3, 2010 7:00am PDT
of foodborne disease we see every year. jennifer ashton is here with more. disgust. one out of seven kitchens wouldn't pass the test. that was conservative, they said. it is probably worse in reality. >> precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are number of foodborne illnesses every year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. this is not an insignificant issue. >> it is ear just. actually a number of them also go unreported. numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolute. >> i what is it? where's the germiest, grimeiest, most bacteria laden spots in the kitchen we need to clean up? >> anywhere that you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator and to the stove handles and everywhere. but these are really the biggest hotspots and start really with what we use to clean our kitchen which is are sponge. >> can i just say this is a plea to everyone, don't u
CBS
Sep 18, 2010 5:00am PDT
. by then it was too late to save jennifer hawke-petit and her two daughters. the delay raises the question did the small-town force have the training and resources to save the victims? joining us to talk it over oh, bill stat ton, private investigators and former new york city police officer. good to have you with us. >> thank you. >> i just want to hear your side of this, your feelings. as a former police officer this has to bother you tremendously at the response time was as long as it was for something like . >> this is well, absolutely. but first, let's say, these two gentlemen are evil personified. forotdefense to make the allegation that somehow the police department's fault this actually happened, you know, that's horrendous, out of the question. but, there are a lot of questions that need to be asked and answered. >> do you think it is just as simple as it is cheshire, an affluent town in connecticut, they don't have resources although you would think with the taxes people pay they would but not have the training or not know how to respond to a quote/unquote big city crime like this? >
CBS
Sep 25, 2010 5:00am PDT
john gilbride and our other own dr. jennifer ashton. good to see both of you. >> good morning. >> what is it about this and why is the dea doing it now. >> well, when you look at the numbers, it's staggering in terms of the number of people that are abusing prescription drugs. seven million people abuse prescription drugs a 13% increase in just one year. when you look at the number of teenagers that are abusing prescription drugs, it's frightening. 2500 teens, on average, every day use prescription drugs to get high for the very first time. so, operation takeback is a chance to get those drugs out of the medicine cabinet where they're just sitting there waiting to be abused. >> jen, as a doctor, how rampant is the abuse that you see in your own office and what is the seriousness of it? because i think a lot of people miss that point this all of this. >> well, i think we don't really know how rampant it is. those numbers we just saw are just really estimates and the fear in medicine, clinical medicine, this key even be worse. i think a lot of people fall in the habit of use, abuse and d
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8